Surprised and touched by La Boheme

The Promenade at the Kennedy Center
The Promenade at the Kennedy Center


Puccini’s La Boheme, had a much greater effect on me than I was expecting.  The storyline was simpler even than the synopsis I read two nights ago… Girl meets boy, they fall in love, girl gets sick, girl dies. The music, the music was much more.  It’s going to take some time to unpack the power of Puccini’s melodies.

The Surprise – La Boheme is principally about people in love, but what really stuck me was their poverty.  Mimi dies of consumption, brought on poor conditions.  In every scene, poverty is an unseen character as the cast cajole their way out of paying rent, trick the aloof Alcindoro into picking up the lunch tab or pawn clothing just to buy food.  In Act I, Scene I, Rodolfo (a poet) burns his poetry just to stay warm.  The duet he sings with his roommate Marcello elevates the moment through their fraternity, but there’s a symmetric tragedy to burning your living just to stay alive.  At the end, Mimi dies shortly after her friends have run to pawn their clothing for medicine.

I spent some time today meditating on the Seventh Commandment, “Thou shalt not steal.”  In relation I consulted the social teaching of the Church to see how I might conceivably have preached Mimi’s funeral.  Catholics believe in a concept called the “destination of material goods” (Catechism Para. 2403-04).  All resources are ultimately intended for the flourishing of the human family.  St. John Paul II said,

“Christian tradition has always understood this right [to property] within the broader context of the right common to all to use the goods of the whole of creation: the right to private property is subordinated to the right to common use, to the fact that goods are meant for everyone.” (Laborem exercens, para. 14.1-2)

NOTE: St. John Paul precedes this with a warning that this teaching “diverges radically from Marxist collectivism… and it differs from the program of capitalism.” Neither system can claim the Church as its own.

What the Church’s social teaching is getting at is this: Before we are “labor or management”… before we are “poor or rich” all of us are “people” … People who can love and sacrifice for each other, just as Christ does.  On that basis we should at least work to keep each other alive and healthy… before we worry about increasing each others property.  Such indeed was the case for poor Mimi, who – as one capable of such love – deserved better than to die for lack of medicine.  …Certainly something to think about as the holidays and (more urgently) the cold weather arrive in the capital of the richest nation in the history of history.

Check out “Touring Tips” for thoughts on Dining before Performances at the KC.