The Beauty of Mary Magdalene

“While we live in our present tent we groan; we are weighed down because we do not wish to be stripped naked but rather to have the heavenly dwelling envelop us,so that what is mortal may be absorbed by life.” (From II Cor 5)

Donatello, Mary Magdalene
Donatello, Mary Magdalene

Today is the Feast of St. Mary Magdalene.  A few years ago, the National Gallery hosted an exhibition, “The Sacred Made Real,” displaying a series of sculptures carved to make people’s favorite paintings in 3-D.  It was the 17th century version of 3-D experience.  One such statue was of today’s saint, Mary Magdalene.  Mary is depicted nude, clothed only with her long hair.  It’s actually an iconic way of portraying the saint who tradition assumes is the “woman caught in adultery.” (Jn 8)  The imagery is shocking, one sees the Magdalene humbled, almost haggard in her nakedness… and yet… This is Mary at her best.  Brought before the Lord, she does not deny her sins, and in that nakedness, in that emptiness she is completely filled by Jesus: Then Jesus stood up again and said to the woman, “Where are your accusers? Didn’t even one of them condemn you?”  “No, Lord,” she said.  And Jesus said, “Neither do I. Go and sin no more.”  She does not clothe herself in defense, in pride.  Sitting in the nakedness of truth, she is lifted from the ground and clothed in new life by Chirst.  In a way, she undoes the dynamic of Eden.  No fig leaf for Mary; whatever shame it may cost in the eyes of men, she is loved by her God, and that becomes enough for her.  At the end of the Gospel (Jn 20:11-18) Mary is again completely empty.  Jesus has been taken from her.  Going to his tomb she weeps and once again he appears, Resurrected, to give her new life.  At this point Mary becomes the apostle to the Apostles, running to deliver the Good News to Peter and the others.

Lavinia Fontana, Jesus Appears to Mary Magdalene
Lavinia Fontana, Jesus Appears to Mary Magdalene

Speaking of Peter, he demonstrates a marked contrast to Mary.  A few nights before (Jn. 18) Mary’s garden encounter with Jesus, afraid, vulnerable, weak, as Christ was being arrested, how does Peter respond?  He slices off the ear of the High Priest’s servant.  Clothed in earthly strength, Peter sets himself up for the biggest fall of all, the triple-denial of Christ later that night.  Like Mary, Peter’s restoration comes days later when in the triple confession of his love for Jesus, his humility gives Christ space to forgive him and restore him as the chief pastor of the Flock.  “Feed my sheep.” (Jn 21)

Sometimes penance comes involuntarily, as it did for Mary when she first met Jesus.  If in those moments we accept our penances we demonstrate wisdom.  Sometimes penance comes… or needs to come… voluntarily, chosen as an exercise to help us grown in wisdom and grace.  We can do this by fasting, praying, giving to the poor or some other form of appropriate self-denial, to – again – make a space our heart for Jesus.  Such is the beauty of Mary Magdalene and the beauty, really, of penance.  It makes a new space in our hearts for Christ and for new life.

“While we live in our present tent we groan; we are weighed down because we do not wish to be stripped naked but rather to have the heavenly dwelling envelop us,so that what is mortal may be absorbed by life.” (From II Cor 5)