Using All Things Well

In The Idea of a University, Blessed John Henry Newman said this:

“We attain to heaven by using this world well, though it is to pass away; we perfect our nature, not by undoing it, but by adding to it what is more than nature, and directing it towards aims higher than its own.”

Newman’s observation plays out well in my last two posts about hip-hop music and the dance form, “jookin” in which a thing of nature (music and dancing) is put to higher, even sacred uses by the human artist in question.  Today I ran into two wonderful 19th-century examples of this same phenomenon.

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The first comes from St. Therese of Lisieux.  During a pilgrimage to Rome, Therese had her first encounter with… wait for it… and elevator!  It may not seem like a big deal to most, but the new technological wonder would eventually be put to sacred uses.  Years later, Therese, recalling the awe of her first elevator ride described Christ’s saving graces lifting us to heaven as… “a spiritual elevator.”  The term is now a classical phrase of 19th century French spirituality.

Another – if more mundane – example is Edgar Degas’ Woman Ironing (on display at the National Gallery).  In it we see what seems like an ordinary scene: a woman ironing in her apartment.  But in 19th-century Paris this was more than a daily task, it was an icon.  It was a new city – rebuilt by Haussmann in the 1850’s… a modern metropolis with modern amenities like irons in ever home.  With a few strokes of his brush, Degas uses this ordinary moment to demonstrate the wonder of a new technological age… as well as some of its burdens.  He generates what we might call today, a teachable moment; something that makes us think about deeper human realities.

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What dimensions of the world we live in stick out to us?  How might we use them to lift the hearts and minds of ourselves and others?  Something to think about as we look on our world with eyes of faith.